Avril Lavigne

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Average User Rating 9.29
Total Reviews 2
Last Reviewed August 20th, 2006
 
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Avril Lavigne Learning to fit into herself during concert
Venue/Date: Greek Theatre (Los Angeles, CA)
Concert Date:  
August 16th, 2005
Reviewer: aceshooter

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9.50

We don't care anymore and neither does she

Review: The mania for her seemingly over, Avril Lavigne prepares for oblivion with a smile at the Greek.

By BEN WENER
The Orange County Register


I'll say this much about fleeting phenom Avril Lavigne: She sure is enjoying herself on the ride down.

There has been a radical change in the petite Canadian's demeanor since the last time local devotees witnessed a headlining performance, in May '03 at Long Beach Arena. Back then, with Avrilmania reaching its zenith, the prefab pop-punker whose hits "Sk8er Boi" and "I'm With You" were inescapable turned in one of the most listless, desultory performances from a budding superstar I've ever seen.

Maybe she had grown overwhelmed by adulation and paparazzi-hounding; maybe she was just tired of the grind - or maybe she was just being a testy 18-year-old. Regardless, her attitude suggested that the last thing she wanted was to continue being Avril Lavigne for worshipful preteens dressed exactly like her.

Fast-forward to Thursday, at the first of two shows at the Greek Theatre, with new star Gavin DeGraw and Butch Walker (co-author of "My Happy Ending") in tow: Out bounds sunnier Avril in a Pam Tillis T-shirt and cut-off jeans, the once-sullen look in her darkened eyes brightened by a beaming smile, her trucker cap ditched to reveal longer, blonder Jessica Simpson hair.

Talk about a transformation. Apparently an engagement to Sum 41 snot Deryck Whibley (you could spot the rock on her ring from 25 rows away) and deflated career expectations agree with her.

It means something that just two years after being the hottest thing on "TRL," Avril can't even sell out a 6,000-seat theater and doesn't seem to mind. It signifies two things, actually: 1) This is the beginning of some kind of dead end for the less-moody sprite; and 2) she seems perfectly willing to play the professional hack from now on, plying her wares indefinitely with all the mannered pseudo-passion of, say, Berlin's Terri Nunn.

Only true fans need bother at this point. She may still score another chart-topping platinum album, but like her second, "Under My Skin," it won't measure up commercially to her 2002 monster debut, "Let Go." Nor is any future music apt to reveal much creative progress; most likely she'll have just traded one collaborator (The Matrix, Chantal Kreviazuk, Ben Moody) for another to convey the same generic wounded-teen-rebel thoughts: I was alone and you didn't care, I'm special, I always get what I want, let's run away, why should I care?

Still trapped in basic emotions even Alanis had let go of by the time of her gargantuan breakthrough. How boring.

I realize it's old hat to compare Avril to Alanis, but the similarities are still too blatant to ignore, right down to Avril's annoying habit of nasally elongating phrases, like so: "Did you think I was gonna give it up to you this ti-eee-yi-eee- yime?" But why such comparisons should cease isn't because Avril is her own woman. It's because she's nowhere near the caliber of Alanis.

Where Alanis, an introspective poet at heart, recovered from the same celebrity overdose by advancing her songwriting via challenging structures and lyrics emboldened by personal yet accessible philosophy, Avril, at roughly the same age, is still babbling on about matters only junior-high girls could care about. "Take Me Away," "Nobody's Home," "Fall to Pieces" - the banal titles alone tell you all there is to know about her feelings.

She's so bereft of ideas that her rather paltry performance concluded not with an attempt at something daring (she's tried "Knocking on Heaven's Door" before) but with limp covers of Blink-182's "All the Small Things" and Blur's woo- hoo-ing "Song 2," with a drumming Avril (making Meg White seem like Keith Moon) and unabashedly hammy Walker on vocals. (He should stick to the Linda Perry method of penning hits for others.)

It was a finish only idolizing girls could love, for that's primarily what she attracts. But though I'd agree with them that Avril is still a cut above Ashlee Simpson and Hilary Duff, this show proved that the margin has gotten dramatically smaller.
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Avril Lavigne Plays a great show!!!
Venue/Date: Saratoga Performing Arts Center (Saratoga Springs, NY)
Concert Date:  
August 25th, 2005
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
9.08

Avril Lavigne pleases the crowd

By GREG HAYMES, Staff writer
First published: Monday, August 29, 2005

review
SARATOGA SPRINGS -- When Avril Lavigne burst onto the scene as a 17-year-old rocker, she immediately was tagged by the press as "the anti-Britney" and "the punk princess."

But, of course, nothing could be further from the truth.

Oh, Lavigne knows how to rock a crowd, and the more than 7,000 fans on hand at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center on Sunday night certainly attested to that fact. On their feet from the opening "Sk8er Boi" straight through to the final encore of "Complicated" some 65 minutes later, the teens, tweens and their parents were enthusiastically waving their cellphones in the air and singing along.

Lavigne is hardly a master entertainer. Mostly she paced back and forth across the stage, sometimes marching, sometimes skipping, as she belted out her hits and most of the album tracks from her latest disc, "Under My Skin." But at least she and her four-piece band kept things moving along at a brisk clip -- stuffing 18 songs into her brief show.

And she managed to show off her musical skills, too. She strummed an electric guitar on several tunes (most notably, "My Happy Ending") and played "Nobody's Home" as a solo selection on an acoustic guitar. She settled down at the grand piano for a pair of midset numbers (notably "Together"), and she even perched behind the drums for an encore, turning the microphone over to opening act Butch Walker.

Sporting big black boots, camouflage pants and a tank top emblazoned with the words "Rocknroll outlaw" on it, Lavigne gave the crowd exactly what they wanted, and that's not a bad thing. In fact, considering that she's still a month away from her 21st birthday, Avril Lavigne just might have a long musical career ahead of her.

Walker was one of the most energetic, hardest-working opening acts that SPAC has seen in some time. Churning out good old-fashioned power-pop with a 21st-century twist, Walker and his backing trio earned plenty of new fans with the wistfully romantic "Mixtape," the kiss-off "Best Thing You Never Had" and an amped-up, semi-ironic rendition of Kelly Clarkson's "Since You've Been Gone" (which turned out to be a pretty good song in his hands).
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