Poison

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Band Summary

Average User Rating 8.29
Total Reviews 2
Last Reviewed August 20th, 2006
 
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0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
Posion Burgettstown,PA Review
Venue/Date: Post-Gazette Pavilion (Burgettstown, PA)
Concert Date:  
July 20th, 2009
Reviewer: Arose5

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
9.06
I have always been the type to cake on the eyeliner, put on an endless barrage of fishnet stockings and to have enough pre-concert hairspray to put a hole in the ozone worthy of making Al Gore dry heave. And while hair metal bands Def Leppard and Poison have thrown out a lot of the big hair glam, when they performed Friday, July 20th, 2009 at the Post-Gazette Pavilion in Burgettstown, Pennsylvania, they still sported the tight clothing and gritty rock music that echoed the ambiance of a '80s show. Once all of the glitter and smoke was clear, the show ended up being one I was happy I went to. First, Cheap Trick kicked off the show with an early performance of "I Want You to Want Me," and followed with an energetic, but forgettable, mix of new and old tunes. Second, Poison went on. Butler County Pennsylvania native Bret Michaels professed his love of Pittsburgh and paced the stage, dishing out front-row high fives while the crowd danced down to party classics like "Unskinny Bop" and "Nothin' But A Good Time." And as the packed house of half-dressed, middle-age "Rock of Love" women screamed for a shot at backstage, he silenced and crooned to them, as usual, with "Every Rose has a Thorn." After they performed that song, they continued performing hit after hit. Eventually the band began running out of time and had to cut the set list short and call it a night. I have seen Poison several times in the past ten years. And although they put on a great show and I was happy to attend this show in particular, the show seemed to be very similar to those I have seen in the past. They always open up with the same song “Look What the Cat Dragged In” and they did this at last week’s show too. The music was great but everything seemed repeated and rehearsed. Even the words that Bret Michaels said echoed ones I have heard from previous shows. But if I put those negative aspects aside, they did a pretty good job of satisfying the audience including myself. Halfway through their set, when I looked back from my fifth row seat, I saw nothing but dancing and signing fans, which is always a good sign. Next welcome the British heavy metal veterans Def Leppard, who ran back and forth from various spots on their flashy, multiplatform, fire-spitting stage. A shirtless Phil Collin performed gripping electric guitar solos while crushing vocals were handled by front man Joe Elliot, who proved he is still in 1981 shape. The parts of their show that I saw included a varied set list with a mid-show acoustic break, with the songs "Two Steps Behind" and "Bringin' On the Heartbreak.” Although I am not an avid Def Leppard fan, I was pretty entertained by their performance. I knew a few of their songs and was satisfied by their ability to keep the crowd’s energy rolling but sound exactly like they do on the radio or on their CDs. Their performance was not bad but it was unable to stop me from leaving the venue early in order to avoid traffic. The focus of my review isn’t Cheap Trick or Def Leppard, but is focused on Poison. Again, I thought they did an excellent job of reaching the audience and capturing their energy and attention, but I think after several Poison shows I am all Poison’d out and probably won’t be returning next year. After paying $150.00 a ticket this year, I think I’ll save my money and go elsewhere, but the great Poison memories will remain forever and I will never say they put on a bad show. It is simply that after seeing them so many times, the same routine show has gotten old.

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0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
Poison is okay
Venue/Date: Tweeter Center For The Perf. Arts (Mansfield, MA)
Concert Date:  
June 30th, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
7.51
Poison bests Ratt in '80s flashback
By Sarah Rodman, Globe Staff | July 2, 2007

When it comes to successful '80s nostalgia shows the purchase of a ticket is like the signing of a contract. The performers agree to play songs the crowd knows, and only songs the crowd knows, and the crowd, in some cases with generous lubrication, will treat said performers to a hero's welcome and charitably overlook the ridiculous period hairdos and physical and vocal deterioration that are side effects of doing 20 years of scissor kicks and shots.

Saturday night at the Tweeter Center only one half of the Poison-Ratt twin bill held up its end of the bargain.

Although their shtick has atrophied somewhat over several years of annual summer touring, the guys in Poison are still having nothin' but a good time churning out their power pop on glam metal steroids. And no one more so than lead singer Bret Michaels, who compensated for diminished vocal oomph on hits like "Ride the Wind" and "Something to Believe In" by executing Rock 101 moves with endearing earnestness. (There was much pelvic wriggling, pounding of his heart, pointing to hot chicks in the crowd, substituting "Boston" for any and all geographical references in songs, etc.)

C.C. Deville gamely played his dual role as nimble ax man and band jester, fingering his fretboard with gusto and singing his solo number "I Hate Every Bone in Your Body . . ." with stoopid glee.

The quartet even neatly sidestepped the "no new stuff" rule by filling the spaces that might've housed album cuts by playing other people's old stuff from their new album of covers, "Poison'd." Furthering the notion that they were more extra loud pop-rock band than true metalheads , they worked up Tom Petty's "I Need to Know," the Marshall Tucker Band's "Can't You See," and the Romantics' "What I Like About You."
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