Rush

Browse Reviews!

 
Band Summary

Average User Rating 8.90
Total Reviews 2
Last Reviewed August 20th, 2006
 
All Concert Photos (click to enlarge)


All User Reviews
 
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Rush is a great value for your dollar
Venue/Date: Utah Cultural Celebration Ctr. (West Valley City, UT)
Concert Date:  
August 6th, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
9.52

Review: Rush gives fans their money's worth

By Dan Nailen
The Salt Lake Tribune
Article Last Updated: 08/07/2007 07:46:43 AM MDT

Posted: 7:36 AM- WEST VALLEY CITY - No one can ever accuse Rush of not giving fans their money's worth.
Monday at Usana, the Canadian trio delivered a monster-sized set every bit as grand in scope and musically adventurous as the band's 30-year back catalog, playing nearly 30 songs in two sets spread across three hours.

The show included everything a long-time Rush fan has come to expect. Geddy Lee provided entrancing bass lines and that love it-or-hate it howl. Neil Peart brought his propulsive rhythms, deadpan demeanor and unnecessary-but-entertaining drum solo. And guitarist Alex Lifeson spent the evening with a grin permanently attached to his face, clearly pleased to be playing for a near-full amphitheater and with one of rock's best rhythm sections.
Rush opened the show, the sun still bright enough to wash out the lights and video images on stage, with a somewhat plodding "Limelight." The trio was up to speed soon enough, though, with Lee's hyperkinetic bass and Lifeson's reggae-tinged guitar tone leading the way on "Digital Man."
A memorable "Freewill" led to the first new song of the night, "The Main Monkey Business" from Rush's latest album, "Snakes & Arrows."
"The Main Monkey Business" and its follow-up, "The Larger Bowl," both met with cheers nearly as loud as the older cuts that followed like "Circumstances" and "Between the Wheels."

After a brief intermission, and the arrival of complete darkness, Rush's stage show was able to take full effect. Three video screens above the band relayed images of animated videos for nearly every song.
Read rest of Review Here URL
Click here to read rest of the review

Was this review helpful to you?      

 
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Rush Rockin the old songs
Venue/Date: Six Flags Darien Lake (Darien Center, NY)
Concert Date:  
July 4th, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
8.28
Rush’s power rock still soars
By Jeff MiersNEWS POP MUSIC CRITIC
Updated: 07/05/07 8:47 AM

Toss Monty Python, John Dos Passos and the “Fragile”- era lineup of Yes into a blender. Mix vigorously.

Add a dollop of synth-pop, some ’60s power-trio rumblings and a few cups of technical virtuosity. You’ve just created Rush, the smartest and most doggedly determined- to-progress band in heavy rock. Humorous, literate and given to instrumental dexterity, the band is truly like no other.

For nearly 35 years, the Canadian trio — bassist/vocalist/ keyboardist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson and drummer/lyricist Neil Peart — has been putting the “progress” in progressive rock, moving rather rapidly from the ambitious, if slightly Zeppelin- derivative nature of its earliest work, into the genrebending grandiosity of late ’70s platters like “Hemispheres” and “A Farewell To Kings,” through the smart idiomatic hybrids of its mid-period, beginning with “Permanent Waves,” and proceeding into the prog-pop of “Power Windows” and “Hold Your Fire” — through all of this, Rush has remained a band apart. It doesn’t so much buck musical trends as ignore them. This has meant an always apparent freshness in songwriting, recording and performance. It has also meant that the musical establishment has no idea where to “put” the band.

Rush fans, however, have never had such a problem, and on a soggy Fourth of July evening, thousands of them opened their hearts to the group’s singular sound and stunning audiovisual presentation across the span of a twin-set, three-hour show at the Darien Lake Performing Arts Center. Much of the evening circled around material from the band’s latest effort, “Snakes & Arrows,” which ranks among Rush’s finest studio records. A sprawling set of tunes, the record at once encapsulates the band’s musical history and shows a way forward — which is inspiring, when you consider how many musical peaks the three have already scaled. In fact, the evening’s second set kicked off with five straight from “Snakes & Arrows,” and this 20 minutes made plain just what it is that separates Rush from so many bands of its era — the new material didn’t just sit comfortably next to the many “classics” sprinkled throughout the set, it often eclipsed those classics.
Read rest of Review Here URL
Click here to read rest of the review

Was this review helpful to you?