Hannah Montana

Browse Reviews!

 
Band Summary

Average User Rating 9.69
Total Reviews 7
Last Reviewed August 20th, 2006
 
All Concert Photos (click to enlarge)


All User Reviews
 
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
Hannah Does It Again: A+++ Concert
Venue/Date: Honda Center (Anaheim, CA)
Concert Date:  
November 5th, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
9.65

Hannah Montana's one singer, two superstars

Fans go crazy however she splits it as the 'Best of Both Worlds' tour comes to Southern California.

By Mikael Wood, Special to The Times

HANNAH MONTANA mania swept into Southern California over the weekend, where it will burn unchecked until Thursday. She'll be in L.A. Wednesday when the Disney Channel superstar is scheduled to reprise her Honda Center performance at Staples Center downtown.

On Saturday evening in Anaheim, the young experimental artist took the stage and spent about 90 minutes exploring the increasingly complicated relationship between television and reality.

Her performance was split into two halves: In the first she portrayed a blond-haired pop star, while in the second she appeared a typical 14-year-old girl whose double life as the blond-haired pop star is a secret to all but her closest friends.

The entire show operated at a frenzied fever pitch, but its David Cronenberg-like climax came right before the encore, when the regular girl sang a duet with her famous alter ego, who'd disappeared from the stage but now reappeared on the screen of a giant video monitor.

Which of us is more real, the artist seemed to be asking the audience, about half of which consisted of perplexed-looking adults obviously confounded by the performer's sophisticated interrogation of our current media moment.

A sea of colorfully attired 10-year-old girls, the other half of the crowd, appeared more comfortable with the presentation. They're familiar with this artist's cutting-edge oeuvre. They watch her TV show and buy her albums and visit her website daily. And, anyway, what's reality?

Shortly after going on sale (and nearly instantaneously selling out) in August, tickets to shows on Montana's 54-date "Best of Both Worlds" tour became the objects of furious Internet auctions. In some reported cases, consumers bought tickets for over 20 times their face value. At deadline, two fourth-row seats for Wednesday's show were available on StubHub, EBay's ticket-resale site, for $1,945 apiece.

Inside the Honda Center, Audrey Lamar of Temecula said she had less trouble buying tickets to see the Rolling Stones and Paul McCartney than she did attempting to purchase two Hannah Montana tickets for her and her 10-year-old daughter, Emily. "I tried to get them through Ticketmaster as soon as they went on sale, but they weren't available," Lamar said. She sent a last-ditch e-mail to Disney pleading her case and was amazed to receive a response Friday promising a pair of floor seats.

So was Hannah worth the hysteria? Depends who's answering.

In the case of the screaming tweens evidently involved in a collaborative effort to create a sound audible in outer space, the answer was yes. Or, more accurately, YYYYEEEESSSS!!!!

To her fans, Hannah (who's played on the Disney Channel series by Miley Cyrus, the daughter of country singer Billy Ray Cyrus), represents an ideal alloy of everygirl charm and larger-than-life charisma. In "Just Like You," a tune from her first album as Hannah Montana, Cyrus sings, "I'm a lucky girl whose dreams came true / But underneath it all I'm just like you." That idea rang somewhat true during Saturday's show, where Cyrus sang, danced and changed costumes like a pro, yet didn't bother to conceal the physical effort required to give such a performance: Her image ballooned to enormous dimensions on the Jumbotron at center stage, Cyrus sweated, had to catch her breath and glugged water from a bottle.

She even admitted to feeling a little under the weather, which she said meant the audience would have to give more than usual to keep the show moving. Try to imagine Beyoncι voluntarily chipping away at her own superstar authority.

Of course, to anyone not already in thrall to the wonder of Cyrus-as-Montana, the singer's likable humility translated to a slight reduction in the wow factor that can make an arena production feel like something more special than a club gig in an airplane hangar.

Saturday's show included plenty of eye-popping details. When your fans clamber to catch little squares of colored paper blasted out of a confetti gun, you know you're doing something right.

But Cyrus' performance didn't always live up to the spectacle swirling around her. That was a product of undeveloped technical prowess but also of indistinct personality. Because we already have so many ideas about who and what a pop star is, Cyrus' Hannah character doesn't really need to work to define herself beyond the image presented on her CD covers. We know that a wild hairdo means we're in the presence of someone who loves to have fun.

But who is Miley? On her TV show, Cyrus utilizes television's simulacrum of reality to depict a version of herself that's lifelike enough to make you care about her. In reality, though, without the aid of a script to establish helpful plot points, she seemed unsure of how to communicate something about herself to her audience.

As she mentioned countless times during the show, Cyrus loves her fans and she's grateful for their support. And most of her songs, though they're brilliant genre exercises full of invention and spirit, rarely offered more than vague inspirational sound bites: Hey, nobody's perfect! Hey, life's what you make it! Hey, who said I can't be Superman?!

But what else? Perhaps the kind of human complexity that seemed to be missing from Saturday's show isn't what Montana's millions are interested in. The squeals of approval that greeted every one of her moves certainly suggested that her fans got their (parents') money's worth.

Yet with its appealingly bizarre dual-persona setup, "Best of Both Worlds" isn't just a simple tween-pop road show. Cyrus deserves more from herself.

Was this review helpful to you?      

 
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful:
Montana plays an inspired set to Rock Out Portland
Venue/Date: Rose Garden Arena (Portland, OR)
Concert Date:  
November 4th, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
9.80

Live Review: Hannah Montana/Miley Cyrus in Portland, OR

October 31, 2007 11:10 AM
The "Best of Both Worlds" tour--featuring Miley Cyrus , her television alter-ego Hannah Montana , and Disney Channel regulars The Jonas Brothers --could easily be categorized as a marketing scheme designed to manipulate fans and their parents for the sake of the almighty buck.

Before the concert at Portland's Rose Garden arena, videos played exclusively from Disney shows. The advertisements scrolling around the venue promoted upcoming events such as Playhouse Disney Live and Disney On Ice: Princess Wishes. There was even an ad for Disney theme parks just before the music started.

So, for the cynical, there was plenty to berate. But, for the thousands of fans at the sold-out show who are too young to care about things like musical integrity, this concert was nearly perfect.

As the opening act, The Jonas Brothers, were lowered onto the stage, the crowd went wild, screaming as if it were the second coming of The Beatles. Looking like a cross between a boy band and an early '80s new-wave act, the boys broke in to their anthem, "Kids Of The Future."

If you didn't know better, you'd think Joe, Nick and Kevin Jonas were seasoned headliners. Those boys are either very good, or they were great students in their "Arena Rock 101" class. Let's not misunderstand: their sound is definitely pop, but lead singer Joe, 18, has a stage presence reminiscent of Steven Tyler and Mick Jagger--and maybe a tad of Green Day thrown in for flavor. He strutted the ramp like an accomplished entertainer and his mic-stand antics made it obvious he knew how to work a stage. On the technical side, the sound was a bit harsh and the vocal mix didn't seem to gel, but no one seemed to mind, or notice for that matter.

As anticipation began building for Hannah Montana, glow sticks began waving throughout the arena. In total rock-star fashion, 14-year-old Cyrus, as Hannah, was lowered to the stage performing the appropriately titled song "Rockstar."

The TV star turned pop-idol obviously knew how to command the stage as she performed a handful of Hannah Montana songs. She really got the crowd going when she began "Pumpin' Up the Party," one of her nearly dozen songs that hit Billboard's Hot 100 chart in 2006. Then, she brought the The Jonas Brothers back on stage to help bridge the Hannah/Miley transformation.

The tour was obviously designed to focus on Cyrus rather than the character she plays on TV. The words, "Meet Miley" scrolled across the backdrops as the pyrotechnics began to burst. As the young performer rose up from the stage, the promise of a new star began to shine. Cyrus began her set with "Start All Over."

Cyrus's songs are less poppy than those she sings as Hannah. And some of the images on the backdrops during her set conveyed a more rockin' feel.

One highlight toward the end of the show came when Cyrus left the stage while her background singers began singing, "Oh, Miley, you're so fine, you're so fine you blow my mind." It was almost an inside joke for the parents who remember Toni Basil in a cheer outfit singing, "Oh Mickey, you're so fine ..." Oblivious to the reference, the younger set, however, loved it when Cyrus returned to the stage in a costume that evoked schoolgirl days, with glittering argyle patterns on her clothes, bicycle riders and skate boarders crisscrossing the stage while dancers donned letterman's jackets and cheer outfits. Even the very young children, who were obviously getting tired, sprang back to life as Cyrus sang a fan favorite, "G.N.O.--Girls Night Out."

Cyrus then told the crowd she was bringing out a friend, and, with a bit of movie magic, Miley and Hannah sang a duet version of "Best of Both Worlds."

Cyrus closed the number with confetti and streamers shooting into the audience, driving the kids who had never seen such a thing wild. For her encore, she changed into a simple outfit, brought her guitar to the front of the ramp and performed a song she wrote for her late-grandfather, "I Miss You." It was nice to see that Cyrus could actually play the guitar while singing the tender song.

With a bit of vocal conditioning to match her excellent stage presence, Cyrus has the potential to grow into a substantial artist. However, if you weren't wowed by the celebrity of it all, you might have thought that Cyrus should have opened the show, with Hannah supporting The Jonas Brothers as headliners. Maybe it's simply the boy/girl thing that made the audience scream for the Brothers. It's tough to say with certainty that they stole the show, but it is very near the truth.

Was this review helpful to you?      

 
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Hannah Makes OC Crowd Go Wild
Venue/Date: Honda Center (Anaheim, CA)
Concert Date:  
November 3rd, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
10.00

Miley Cyrus makes her fans all smiley in Anaheim

The star of the hit Disney Channel show 'Hannah Montana' elicits screams from young fans.

The Orange County Register
 

When the fictional character you love more than anything else steps out of your TV to appear in flesh and blood and rhinestones before your very eyes – well, who wouldn't scream?


And so when the moment came – when Hannah Montana of Disney Channel fame descended from the rafters of Honda Center in a backlit cage on Saturday – you can pretty much imagine the ear-piercing shrieks of an "OMG-I-can't-believe-it's-her!" nature that erupted from the crowd.


This was the Big One for tween entertainment this fall, a concert tour that sold out within a minute or two of tickets going on sale in each city. A ticket so coveted that desperate parents threw themselves on the expensive mercy of ticket brokers. And any kid lucky enough to score a ticket could barely stand the wait.

Stepping out the cage, real-life star Miley Cyrus – who performed as her TV character for the first half of the show – sashayed down the runway singing "Rock Star," twinkling in a black-and-silver-spangled top over knee-high leggings and black boots.


"Life's What You Make It" followed that, with eight backup dancers bounding around the stage, then "Just Like You," and by then – three songs in – it was time for the first of a half-dozen costume changes.


Appearing back on stage in blue jeans – sparkly, sparkly blue jeans – to sing the song "Old Blue Jeans," Miley kept the crowd enthralled, and with good reason: these songs are practically part of their musical DNA by now, listened to over and over again on the Disney Channel sitcom, on Radio Disney, and the CDs that have sold by the millions.


And here's the thing – easy as it is for non-believers to mock Hannah and Miley, if you set aside your prejudices, it's easy to like this stuff.

The songs are catchy, with strong hooks and melodies – far better than the Partridge Family pop yours truly grew up on. And unlike some other tween acts, Miley had a real five-piece rock band backing her up and seemed to be doing more real singing than Britney Spears or Ashley Simpson or any number of other divas do.

"Nobody's Perfect" had my 6-year-old deputy reviewer Anna Lily jumping up and down on her seat, where she stayed through "We Got the Party," on which Miley was joined by her opening act, the Jonas Brothers.


After that, the second half of the show opened with Miley as Miley – gone was the platinum wig her character wears in her rock-star guise on TV, present was the real 14-year-old singing songs she recorded under her own name, including hits "Start All Over," "East Northumberland High," and "G.N.O. (Girl's Night Out)," her latest Radio Disney hit.


In just under 90 minutes she was done, and the crowd filed out, exhausted but happy.


"I never thought it was going to be like that," said Kimmie Daniels, 12, of Corona, who came with friend Taylor Young, 12, and the "Miley Rox Our Sox" sign that they'd made. Left at home was their scrapbook on why they love Miley.


"She's beautiful," Kimmie said.


"She's a great singer," Taylor added.


And on and on, making it clear how much the show had meant to them – and all the other kids – who'd been there.

Was this review helpful to you?      

 
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Hannah Rules Another City...World Domination Next!
Venue/Date: Oakland Arena (Oakland, CA)
Concert Date:  
November 1st, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
9.65

Pop princess Montana rules Oakland

One piece of advice was constantly repeated to parents and other adults attending the Hannah Montana concert Thursday night in Oakland: Wear some earplugs.

That wasn't a sly dig at Montana's Radio Disney-approved music -- or that of her alter-ego, and real person, Miley Cyrus. It was merely words of caution since there was to be screaming on this night -- lots of it.


The high-pitched screams of pure joy coming from the thousands of pre-teen girls packing the Oracle Arena arrived in constant waves. The girls started screaming well before their idol took the stage, as the big overhead screens showed a steady succession of pictures of the 14-year-old singer. Yet, those were nothing in comparison to the shrieks heard once the house lights dimmed and all the months of waiting was over.

At that point, it was pure Montana-mania.


There's been a lot of that going around lately. The Hannah Montana tour -- featuring Cyrus both performing as herself and appearing as the lead character of the popular Disney Channel show -- has turned out to be the hottest ticket of the year. Supply has been dwarfed by demand on this tour, which includes a date Sunday at the HP Pavilion in San Jose, and there are reports of people paying thousands of dollars for tickets.

Hopefully, those occurrences didn't happen for the Oakland show since promoters released a batch of tickets on the day of the concert.

Much like Disney's "High School Musical'' was in 2006, Hannah Montana has become this

year's true pre-teen music phenomenon. The TV show is a mega-hit, the soundtracks top the album charts and the tour is selling-out across the country. For someone, say, over the age of 15, it might be hard to understand all the fuss.

The show's premise is fairly simple -- a young teen balances a double-life as high school student and rock star -- yet it's certainly captured the attention of young, mostly female audiences.


"She's a young girl who all the other young girls want to be like,'' said Hayward resident Melissa Martinez, who brought her 8-year-old daughter, Ericka, to the show. "Every day, my little girl comes home and she's got to watch `Hannah Montana.' ''


Opening with "Rock Star,'' a track from this year's "Hannah Montana 2: Meet Miley Cyrus,'' the young singer delivered a razzle-dazzle 75-minute performance that was full of costume changes, big dance numbers and plenty of personality. The multi-media star -- the daughter of country singer Billy Ray "Achy Breaky Heart'' Cyrus -- divided the set into two parts.

In the first half, she played her TV character, Hannah Montana, and then spent the second half introducing the crowd to Miley Cyrus. She played the characters like separate entities, going so far as to greet the crowd anew once she took off the blonde wig and "transformed'' into Miley.


This is where the true genius of this situation can be found. For every new movement in pop music, it seems, there are two leaders -- from the Beatles and the Rolling Stones to Nirvana and Pearl Jam to 'N Sync and the Backstreet Boys to Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. By establishing two distinct characters, Cyrus has been able to fill both chairs and hasn't left much room for outside competition. She's also made herself less dependent on Disney and provided an avenue to grow professionally and attract older crowds. Like I said -- genius.


Of course, this Hannah Montana thing is working so well for her that she might just retire at age 15 and live very comfortably off her earnings. What she earned on this night at the merchandisce booth, given the hundreds of kids wearing tour T-shirts, must have been staggering.


"We have to buy the Hannah Montana clothes, the Hannah Montana dresses, the Hannah Montana hairpieces,'' said Castro Valley's Kara Costa, who was in attendance with her two daughters, 10-year-old Marissa and 8-year-old Jordan. "We have to have the whole thing.''


Watching the kids react to the show, it was easy to draw comparisons to other pop-music phenomenoms from the past -- like `N Sync, Britney and, even, the Beatles. For some in attendance, however, there's simply no comparison. One of those folks was Castro Valley's Sarah Luzuriaga, who brought her 9-year-old nieces, Kaylei Mae Long and Cori Ann Long, to the concert.


"This is bigger than the Beatles for the girls,'' she said.

Was this review helpful to you?      

 
7 of 17 people found the following review helpful:
Hannah is for Real: The Girl puts on an A++ Show
Venue/Date: Rose Garden Arena (Portland, OR)
Concert Date:  
November 1st, 2007
Reviewer: aceshooter

      Venue Parking  
      Venue Security  
      Opening Band  
      Opening Song  
      Set List  
      Band Connection  
      Band Energy/Intensity/Showmanship  
      ConcertGoer Energy/Intensity  
      Sound Quality  
      Set and Lighting Design (SLD)  
      The Finish/Encore  
9.98

Here's why Hannah Montana rules

Posted by Grant Butler November 01, 2007 10:09AM


It didn't take long Tuesday night to feel like a fish out of water at the "Hannah Montana" concert.

At the Rose Quarter box office, I asked the ticket seller for a single ticket, and was stared down with a look of utter disbelief.

"For tonight?" he asked incredulously.


He had cause to wonder whether I'd lost my mind. As a middle-aged man, I couldn't have been more removed from the target demographic for the tween idol Hannah Montana, a jet-setting pop star played by 14-year-old Miley Cyrus on the popular Disney TV show. And from the looks of the crowd milling outside the arena - mostly moms and young daughters on a girls night out - I clearly didn't fit in.


Because the show wasn't completely sold out, despite weeks of online ticket-reselling mania on eBay, Craigslist and the like, I was able to snag a great seat right next to the stage.


"Have fun," the ticket seller said as he handed me my chit, making me feel like a complete weirdo.

Here's what's not weird: By the end of Cyrus' 90-minute, 17-song set, I was captivated by the "Hannah Montana" experience and figured out why she's so enormously appealing to girls between 8 and 12.

For starters, there's the clothes. Cyrus had seven costume changes, an array of sequined tops, shiny boots and glittering jeans that were more Technicolor than a Disney cartoon. And everything was covered in cascades of glitter and rhinestones. How could anyone resist a wardrobe that's so high on the sparkle factor?

And this gal can move and sing. Whether she was being herself or her secret alter ego "Hannah," Cyrus and her 10 backup dancers and singers covered every inch of the stage and its catwalk - which extended 10 rows into the audience - like caffeinated panthers. Almost every number was up-tempo and just the stuff for pulse-racing popping, locking and strutting.


All that onstage energy carried over to the crowd. Cyrus asked everyone to stand up and dance, and the arena became a sea of waving arms, jiggling glow sticks and unison jumping in place. As fun as Cyrus was to see, it was more fun to watch all that youthful energy in motion.


The whole "Hannah"/Miley dual identity of both the TV and arena show is irresistible, too. As "Hannah," she's an international sensation. But she can retreat to being Miley, a regular teen unencumbered by the pitfalls that typically come with stardom, like tabloid photographers and greedy hangers-on.


Still, more than anything, Cyrus' appeal is rooted in her songs. There's not an ounce of cynicism in her music, with most of the lyrics exploring themes of daring to dream, believing in yourself and building self-confidence. These ideas mesh perfectly for girls making that difficult life transition that a pre-looniness Britney Spears once perfectly described: "I'm not a girl, not yet a woman."


In "East Northumberland High," Cyrus delves into the experience of first-time heartbreak with the resilience of laughter winning out over sadness. With "Nobody's Perfect," she sings about how everyone makes mistakes, and that messing up shouldn't be an excuse for giving up. And with "Life's What You Make It," she celebrates individuality and how much fun it can be to be different from everyone else.


That certainly rang true with me. Tuesday night, I was the square peg at the "Hannah Montana" show. But that didn't stop me from giggling and having a great time, too.

Was this review helpful to you?      


Next >   Last >|